Conceptual Change

Motivation

The present study used the Cognitive Reconstruction of Knowledge Model (CRKM) model of conceptual change as a framework for developing and testing how key cognitive, motivational, and emotional variables are linked to conceptual change in physics. This study extends an earlier study developed by Taasoobshirazi and Sinatra (J Res Sci Teach 48:901–918, 2011) by providing a more comprehensive test of the CRKM. The variables included in the model tested in this study included emotions: boredom, enjoyment and anxiety; approach goals, need for cognition, motivation, deep cognitive engagement, course grade, and conceptual change. Results of a path analysis conducted on 117 introductory-level college physics students indicated that enjoyment was linked to students’ motivation, deep cognitive engagement, course grade, and conceptual change. Motivational variables were linked to cognitive engagement, course grade, and conceptual change. Finally, students’ course grade was linked to their conceptual change. Need for cognition, boredom, and anxiety played no role in the model. An alternative, revised model was presented excluding these three variables. Theoretical and practical implications of the study are discussed.

EFFECTS OF A ONE-SHOT GROWTH MINDSET INTERVENTION ON BELIEFS ABOUT INTELLIGENCE AND ACHIEVEMENT GOALS by DeBacker, T.K., Heddy, B.C., Kershen, J.L., Crowson, H.M., Looney, K., & Goldman, J.A.

2018

This investigation employed a longitudinal design to examine the influence of a one-shot growth mindset intervention on ninth-graders’ implicit beliefs about intelligence and related achievement goals in four different samples. The intervention conformed to characteristics of ‘wise interventions’. Participants’ incremental beliefs about intelligence and achievement goals were measured prior to the intervention and at several subsequent points in time following the intervention. Our results provide modest evidence that the one-shot intervention can promote incremental views of intelligence and reduce the prevalence of performance goals when used at scale.

The purpose of this study was to explore whether conceptual change predicted emotional and attitudinal change while learning about genetically modified foods (GMFs). Participants were 322 college students; half read a refutation text designed to shift conceptual knowledge, emotions, and attitudes, while the other half served as a control group. The results suggest that the refutation text effectively facilitated change in conceptual knowledge, emotions, and attitudes. The hypothesized relationship among the variables was explored using structural equation modeling. The analysis showed that when participants experienced knowledge change toward more scientifically accepted conceptions of GMFs, their emotions became more positive and less negative, which predicted a subsequent shift toward more-positive attitudes. The results suggest that change in emotions mediates the relationship between conceptual and attitudinal change. Several theoretical and practical implications are discussed including the impact that these findings may have on science education.

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